Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

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Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

Post by Admin on Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:16 pm

In at least 250 words, summarize your understanding of the reading and a few points you are ready to apply.

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Re: Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

Post by matthewostermeyer on Wed Apr 25, 2018 9:09 pm

In talking about a man with a mission, I felt that Breen made an excellent point when referring to the “right mission”. I believe that too often the church tries to do the work of God without actually listening for the spirit and obeying where God is truly leading us. We try to make our own movements happen that our planted in our minds rather than allowing the mission and the heart of sharing the gospel to create the movement before our very eyes. The correct mission is needed in order for a kingdom movement to take place. God also may spend time in our lives bringing these movements to being while we continue to do the mission he has placed in our hearts. We need to be patient as Paul was patient and appreciate each season of life for what it has to offer. God is speaking to us and building us up in the faith so we will be ready for the plans he has for us.
The importance of contextualizing the message is clearly set forth in this section of our reading. The gospel can be preached in the same manner to everyone in the world, but this does not mean it will be received the same. Varying cultures might have different understandings of the world around them and therefore these cultures will have their brokenness shine through different cracks of the gospel. Only when we listen and watch and are aware of the specific message that people need to hear can the gospel begin moving forward in a powerful way.
Perhaps the most important part of the kingdom movement is the vessel for it. While the vessel is the believer through which the Holy Spirit works the greater vessel is the body of Christ in which we are unified by one spirit. Godliness is reflected in the body of Christ as oikos. As true and genuine extended family. Believers who fall in love with one another for who and what they are in Christ, and who God has made them to be. Believers who go out to share the gospel and share the invitation to join the family to all people.
The necessity of focusing on a movement that will result in multiplication and the training of new leaders is so important. Our lives as leaders are finite but the kingdom of God is able to move forward powerfully if others are trained to do the work we have done. Jesus tells his disciples that they will go on to do even greater things than he has been doing. This is the mentality we should embrace when going on mission. We need to step forward as leaders in humility and admit that our followers could do greater things then we ever have. Only with this belief will the kingdom of God move forward powerfully.
The importance of orbiting or coming together as an oikos is something that I see lacking in my everyday life and something that I don’t know if our ministry does well at IU. I resonate well with the writer discussing how his staff comes together everyday before beginning to pray, worship, and read the scripture together. He also talked about the importance of listening to God each day collectively as a staff together. I feel that this is the most important aspect of any kingdom movement. I believe this is what strengthens the core of the ministry. We know that we are unified by one Spirit, but do we live as a church who believes this is the most important thing? Is the Spirit something worth seeking collectively on a regular basis as the early church did in Acts? Are our personal devotions enough? As a group going together on mission I think it is absolutely necessary for us to spend more time devoting ourselves to the Word, fellowship, prayer, etc.
I am thankful for the heart of the author. He offers so much practical advice but at the end of this section he responds with the real heart of the kingdom movement. To have delight in the Lord and to listen to what He is asking of us. Then it is our job to go and do this. It is not about all of the principles and examples. That is not what will effect great moves of God. It is his Holy Spirit who is already opening up doors, and us listening to that Spirit.

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Re: Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

Post by kellyrenelantz on Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:12 am

I think while reading this it was interesting to think about it in my immediate context (campus ministry) and my future context (the marketplace).
In campus ministry, we have four years (give or take) to raise up leaders in our ministry and usually only have them for a season. I think in the marketplace discipling and raising up missional leaders takes a lot more intentionality and is probably more difficult. That's when I thought the "orbiting" part of the book came into play. In college ministry, it is a lot easier to connect with students and to have them cross your paths throughout the week. There are a lot of organic things that come up, and it does take some organization, but not as much as I anticipate it will in the marketplace.
When they talked about Jo Saxton stopping by for dinner, it is clear that is one opportunity to reach out to others and have them "orbit" into your schedule.
I think this part of the book really hit home because I was leaving and this year I have done my best to try and teach my girls what I have learned in college about God, about life, and about ministry. I have done my best to equip them (with the guidance of the Holy Spirit) and hope I have given them the tools and discernment to be able to listen to God and reach out to people around them.
This book also helped me realize we need to constantly revisit our ministry's needs periodically with leadership and analyze where we are weak and pray about what God wants to do in a new season. We need to consistently assess our up, in and out aspects to best serve the people in our ministry and let God do what He wants to build His Kingdom.

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Re: Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

Post by Brittony on Wed May 02, 2018 7:05 pm

Chapters 8 definitely struck me in Mike Breen’s Leading Kingdom Movements. Breen emphasizes contextualizing the Gospel for different people. At first I thought it was a no brainer, as youth groups and conferences contextualize messages for their age groups. Even as I ministered to my girls this past year, it was easy to share the Gospel in a way that they understand as well as easy to hang out with them in the “structure and spontaneity” kind of way. However, the same couldn’t be said for the international students I interacted with. I thought the language barrier was the only barrier I had to jump over, nope. For some reason it came to me as a total surprise as to how much and how often I had to break down the Gospel for my international friends. It was hard. I learned very quickly I didn’t know how to share the Gospel with them as well as I thought. For me I had to start at square one in Gospel sharing. I was, and still am partially that guy who wants to “be a missionary by buying a plane ticket.” This was definitely me in the Fall Semester.
At the beginning of the year, the international office at Ball State puts on a huge event where international students show off their cultures. I saw this as a good opportunity to go deeper in the Ball State International Community. I wanted to be friends with Chinese students. I thought, I could just join them in conversation and I would be their immediate friend! No. That was the opposite of what happened. I didn’t know anyone in their community. I didn’t have a step in the door. They didn’t trust me so they certainly weren’t looking to be friends. It wasn’t until recently that our Chinese friends have trusted us more and more. One of them, Doris, opened up about her family life and religion back in China for the first time a month ago. As I listened, she said a lot about Buddhism. From her experience it’s a work-based religion and she didn’t like it. And from my understanding China is a work-based culture. That was my context to share the Gospel! This was the gap in Doris’ worldview. I see a lot more clearly now how important contextualizing the Gospel is, especially when it comes to international students.
Many of them may have never heard about the Gospel, maybe about Jesus, but not the salvation he brings. I think it’s just all too easy to forget about contextualizing the Gospel for international students, something we don’t, or at least I don’t, dwell on as often as we do with American students.
This became a large reality check for me as I had a one-on-one with my Japanese friend, Nagomi. She said in her village there was a billboard that said, “Jesus is everything.” There wasn't a context of Jesus in her life to understand what that sign meant. She knew nothing about Jesus except for the 5 letters that spelled his name so she not only didn’t understand the sign but was in fear of it. She said that many Japanese people don’t understand the name of Jesus either. Now she has a better context of who Jesus is and the love he’s displayed for her. Now, months later she’s grown to love him and wants other people in Japan to understand Jesus in a much better context than just a name on a billboard. She understands contextualizing the Gospel for her people to grow to love Jesus just as she has.
After reading Breen I want to make international students much more of a priority in my life. It’s encouraging yet challenging contextualizing the Gospel for my international friends but like Nagomi, I hope they understand the love Jesus has for them so that they can help their people also understand Jesus.

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Re: Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

Post by SHKelly on Wed May 09, 2018 5:10 am

These sections were pretty pithy. It felt like every turn had a new alliteration or some xy graph. But they were all good things that should be revisited again and again. In the chapter, Paul: Method, Breen talked about the rhythms of structured and spontaneous, organized and organic, Temple and Home, and how it is important for our ministries to have both in balanced measure. In Chi Alpha at Ball State, our guys Resource Team has been developed in how we balance these two fairly well by having Organized times every week (our RT meeting on Sundays, the "Mandate Monday" guys hangout every Monday, and of course our individual core groups, and Encounter) and having Organic times too (meals together, hanging out on the weekends, members of the RT living together, etc.). This has really served us well and is, I think, the primary reason that the guys are multiplying so much better than the girls.
In the second half of that chapter Breen goes into a discussion on how small groups are killing the growth of the church and how the oikos detailed in the Bible is a better and more natural model for relational growth. I agree that the extended family size is easier for new people to enter and if we focus on developing that we will see more people become a part of our community and hopefully begin being disciple by someone. But, we still need that small group for accountability and deeper discipleship. I know his model has both, so maybe he’s mainly speaking to correct our overemphasis that to set a once-for-all prescription.
I also like the conclusion’s emphasis on the need for Spiritual Warfare together as an oikos.

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Re: Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

Post by kkuriyama on Wed May 09, 2018 6:21 am

I loved the Barney story. I think understanding the relationship with Paul and him was so touching and amazing in terms of discipleship and kingdom movements. What happened to Paul "after Barney shows up" is the beginning of everything, and to trace that beginning is so awesome to see. The mission is birthed in a person's soul and mind, and that mission is carried out because of what God has done. Just like the truism reads: what God has done in you, He wants to do through you. Applying what God has done in our lives to others is contextualization, and I appreciate how much the author understands how important that is. Incarnation is understanding culture. I also loved how the author keeps reminding us that oikos is the answer, and it is the heart beat of everything. It gives us hope because it's not hard to do. And as long as you understand oikos, everything else will flow and follow through it.

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Leading Kingdom Movements

Post by lleeson on Wed May 09, 2018 6:23 am

I love the author’s character study on Paul in describing what kingdom movements should look like. I’ve read Acts a few times, but this author did a great job at going deeper into what was going on, why the disciples were making certain decisions, and what their lives looked like when starting the church. It made Acts seem more relatable instead of this amazing missionary movement that we could never replicate today.

I love the belief that to be a missionary, one must be an anthropologist. I never noticed how Paul learned to understand a culture and give a message that culture could understand. He always shared the gospel, but shared it in understandable terms to them. That is what made him such a successful communicator and missionary, understanding the audience. Our jobs on the campus is to know where the students are, what language they speak, and what they care about. Then we can go to them, speak to them in a way they can understand, and pierce their hearts where they need the Gospel.

It’s easy to want to depend on ourselves through leading. We trust ourselves because we know ourselves, but I appreciate Breen emphasizing that in order for this to become a movement throughout the world, Paul had to submit to the Father and trust Him to work through him. When Paul used less of himself, God could actually do more! That doesn’t mean be lazy and sit around, but instead of working until you die or burn out, trust God. Pray more than do. I feel like that is the tipping point to a kingdom movement. If we want something big to happen, we need God to do it. We can’t rely on our own strength, but God’s true power is made perfect in our weakness.


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Re: Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

Post by DaneMiles on Wed May 09, 2018 4:23 pm

The main takeaway for me from the reading was the pain which Paul suffered. Looking at the 10-13 years where he was laying low in Tarsus, Breen makes clear his plight. Paul was excommunicated five times, he was probably divorced and abandoned by his family, and beaten beyond recognition. His young frame was akin to a hunchback. Why does Breen show us this? It seems that this profound suffering was a necessary part of Paul's sanctification in preparation for his mission work. In the model of explosion/erosion/earthquake/dig, we see that the "gold" or life is often found in the deepest pits. It takes experiences in life which prune and test to truly bring about lasting fruit. This reality, while somewhat bleak, reminds me of the holiness which we receive in our suffering. For Paul, his mission would have been fundamentally misguided if he had not experienced his quiet years.

A couple other elements which I especially appreciated: Barnabas' trust in Paul and his reminding Paul of God's call on his life; the principle of orbiting missional communities and others so as to provide mass, as the Highs Boson does (very interesting and makes a lot of sense as a resource leader); quantifying the organized-organic structure as a home-temple one. It helps to understand the difference and importance of each. The quote by Rhodes on 108 sums it so nicely: "the answer to polarity is almost always paradox."

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Re: Missional Leadership: Leading Kingdom Movements (3-5)

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